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Posts tagged ‘Union Square Farmer’s Market’

Not So Plump Dumpling

Dumplings with Winter Farmer's Market Veggies (and Siracha of Course)

Everyone loves a good dumpling, but if you’re just ordering from the Chinese place around the corner, chances are their veggie dumplings will be made with thick dough, and filled with little more than cabbage. This appitizer is suprisingly easy to make at home with store-bought wonton wrappers, and it’s possible you can even have a healthy, flavor-filled batch ready before take out could arrive at your door.

You can get pretty creative with how you stuff your dumplings, just decide if the ingredients need to be cooked prior to filling (steaming only takes about 5 minutes, and you want the filling to be soft… so if it won’t be soft (or for a protein, cooked) in 5 minutes give it a quick saute), and then give them a quick chop in the food processor. Even in the winter you can find amazing greens and root vegetables that are in season, and incredibly nutritious (and of course, delicious).

For my dumplings I used some of the amazing produce I got yesterday at the Union Square Farmer’s Market. I got Shiitake and Pioppini Mushrooms from John D. Madura Farm. The Pioppini have a great peppery flavor, and are an excellent addition to stir-frys as well.

Shiitake and Pioppini Mushrooms from John D. Madura Farms at the Union Square Greenmarket

I also diced, and sautéed some Sweet Potato. I also quickly sautéed the Baby Bok Choy, even though it was super tender, I just wanted to make sure the bottoms of the leaves had no crunch in the dumpling.

Baby Bok Choy

While the ingredients cooked, I made a sauce based on a Mark Bittman recipe for Steamed Shrimp and Cilantro Shu Mai . A simple mixture of Soy Sauce, Sesame Oil, Rice Wine, Scallions, and Fresh Ginger this sauce will hold the ingredients together in the dumpling, as well as serve as a dipping sauce later.

I gave the cooked ingredients a quick pulse in the food processor along with a few tablespoons of the sauce.

Fill the won-ton wrappers with about a teaspoon of the mixture. Moisten the edges with water, fold in half to make a triangle, and crimp the edges just like a pie crust. To make a Shu-Mai shape, just gather the edges around the center instead of folding, pleating the edges, but leaving some filling exposed.

Steam for about 5 minutes (until wrapper is completely tender), or give a quick pan sear like I did.

For Sauce:

1/2 cup Soy Sauce
1 T Rice Wine
1 T Sesame oil
1 T Minced Ginger (or more… to taste)*
1/4 Cup Chopped Scallions (White only)

*To peel ginger try using a spoon, much easier!

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I Don’t Think You’re Ready For This Jelly.

Jam and Baguette, with toasted Walnuts and Patches of Star fresh Chevre from Union Square Farmer's Market

Last night, after doing our butchering detail in class, Chef Remy gave us a quick lesson on pickling, and gave me this delicious recipe for Raspberry, Black Pepper, and Balsamic Jam. While raspberries are obviously not in season for us here in the Northeast, I just had to share this simple but outstanding jam. The balsamic plays up the tartness of the berries, and the black pepper adds a surprising bite. We sampled some with fresh baguette and chevre, which was absolutely amazing. The jam has so much flavor it really should be paired with a mild cheese, I’m also looking forward to experimenting with it with some dessert flavors (very dark chocolate?) We’re thinking of serving it with johnnycakes in our Southern-style buffet in a few weeks.

Cooking the jam...

Raspberry, Black Pepper & Balsamic Jam
(Makes about 2 quarts… easy to adjust for smaller batches)

2 500g bags frozen raspberries
1 pint fresh raspberries
1 kg (about 2.2 lbs) granulated sugar
2 T ground black pepper
3 oz (1/4 c) good Balsamic Vinegar

-If raspberries are frozen solid, heat these in a large sauce pot first.
-Add sugar while stirring.
-After all sugar has been mixed in, add the pepper and Balsamic Vinegar.
-Keep mixture at a low simmer until it begins to thicken (about 15 mins). Keep in mind that because no pectin is being used for this recipe it will be a loose jam. Add more sugar to thicken up the jam if it doesn’t reach a syrup-like consistency after 30 minutes over low heat.

-To make a smaller batch, the important ratio to remember is equal parts fruit and sugar, adjust the black pepper and balsamic to taste.